Floor Installation Students Give Back

“Although there is often sadness and disappointment at The Johannesburg Children’s Home, there is also joy and hope. There is a constant renewal of all that is good in life and windows of hope are always there to open and look out of.” – Joan Rubinstein, Johannesburg Children’s Home Director, 1983 -1994.

BEFORE (3)

As the world continued to celebrate the life of the great Nelson Mandela in the month of July, on 19 July 2016, the Sparrow FET College’s Installation of Floor Coverings students dedicated their time to helping renew the Johannesburg Children’s Home. Through the invite of one of the FET College’s corporate funders, Kevin Bates, the students spent two days installing carpets at the child and youth care center.

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“It’s amazing that the whole city is supporting those in need. It’s even more incredible that we have these young people who also face challenges coming here to give back and help those in need,” says Johannesburg Children’s Home Director, Annette Brokensha.

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Despite this being an opportunity to do good, it was also great practical experience for the students, which in turn boosted their morale. “It was great for the students to come here and get some real work experience. They also got to see one of the former students working at Kevin Bates, I hope that will help motivate and encourage them,” says Installation of Floor Coverings Facilitator, Wayne Hendricks.

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Thabiso Mbele training the students.

Thabiso Mbele, who is now a permanent employee at Kevin Bates was part of the Installation of Floor Coverings  programme in 2013.  “It’s a great feeling for me to be able to help the students that are coming behind me because I’ve been down that road.  I’ve realised how important it is to have someone with experience giving you a hand. I’m contributing to helping improve their chances of getting employed,” says Mbele.

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Stimulating literacy during holidays

Help your child practice their reading and writing skills by using the play dough recipe below. Explain to your child that they will be helping you make play dough. Read the play dough recipe together with your child to help them practice their reading skills.

Try sounding out the letter sounds in words that they struggle with, e.g. “k” + “uh” + “p” for “cup”. Tell your child to write out their own play dough ingredients list to help them practice their spelling. You can help them by reading out the ingredients from the play dough recipe one line at a time.

At the grocery store, encourage your child to read out their ingredients list to you. At home, read out the directions of the recipe together. Then, let your child read out the instructions for you to follow. Lastly, invite some of their friends over and watch them enjoy playing with the play dough together.

Playdough recipe

Ingredients:

  1. 1 cup cold water
  2. 1 cup salt
  3. 2 teaspoons vegetable oil
  4. food colouring
  5. 3 cups of flour
  6. 2 tablespoons cornstarch
  7. 1 teaspoon vanilla essence

Directions: Pour wet ingredients and salt together in a bowl. Stir well. Gradually add flour and cornstarch. Knead until firm. Store in an airtight container.

Words by Candice Tu, she studied Speech Therapy at the University of Cape Town and graduated with a Bachelor of Science in Speech-Language Pathology with honours in 2013.

Tu forms part of the organisation’s Learner Support Unit. This is a multidisciplinary team of therapists who provide additional academic and emotional support across the organisation.

Occupational Therapy, Speech Therapy, Remedial Therapy and Counselling is provided individually or in small groups. Standardised and screening assessment is conducted to track the progress and development of learners.

To book an assessment for your child for 2017, contact 011 482 1015.

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Lions visit Sports Coaching students

There has been an increase and demand for junior and beginner sports coaches in schools and private clubs in South Africa. After identifying this need, the Sparrow FET College along with one of its partners has introduced a Sports Coaching programme at NQF 4, which officially commenced on 27 June 2016.

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As a way to boost morale, the new students were thrilled to get a visit from the Lions Rugby Union’s junior team as part of their community outreach programme. The students had the opportunity to meet, greet and film with the team for Lion’s official television show, Pride of Jozi, which airs on SuperSport TV. “We are really excited to be here and helping motivate these young people. We hope that we can help bridge the inequality gaps and inspire these students to go and gain employment,” says Lions For Life Creative Director, Michelle Diamond.

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The programme will be facilitated by the Sparrow Schools Educational Trust’s Head of Sports, Liam Gallagher. “I am really looking forward to working  with these candidates and developing them into potential top level coaches of the future, who will give back to the community and teach our future sporting stars,” says Gallagher.

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The purpose of the programme is to train and develop sports coaches which will operate in the sport and physical education environment. The programme will provide access to further training in sports coaching education and international accreditation towards a professional career in a chosen sporting code.

This new programme addition follows the introduction of the Business Administration programme in January. The College prides itself in being able to grow and expand against tough economic conditions when unemployment remains rife in South Africa.

For more information on this programme and other offerings at the Sparrow FET College or to book an assessment, contact 011 482 4410 or email academics@sparrowschools.co.za

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Helping A Child With Low Self-Esteem

Self-esteem is the way people see themselves. Children develop self-esteem very early in life and are shaped by their own expectations as well as the expectations of significant people in their life, such as parents, caregivers or peers.

Self-esteem is an important factor in a child’s motivations and achievements and can have an effect on their performance in school, sports, social relationships and the ability to recover from disappointment. A child’s self-esteem can change from day to day, however, their overall self-esteem plays a major role in their emotional development. Children with low self-esteem will tend to settle for modest accomplishments and may feel shame or inadequacy and are more likely to conform to their peer group and adopt their behaviours and values. Children with low-self esteem are often not able to deal with stress and failures.

To determine if a child has low self-esteem, look for the following signals:

  • A child who avoids a task or challenge without even trying or quitting at the first sign of frustration.
  • Cheating or lying when the child thinks they are going to lose.
  • Drop in school grades.
  • Social withdrawal or little contact with friends.
  • Makes self-critical comments like “nobody likes me”.
  • Overly sensitive about other people’s opinion of them.

How can you help a child with low self-esteem? In order for a child to develop a healthier self-esteem, they will need the following:

  1. Sense of security: Children must feel secure about themselves and their future.
  2. Sense of belonging: Children need to feel accepted and loved by others. This begins in the family and extends to friends, schoolmates, and other groups.
  3. Sense of purpose: Children should have goals that give them purpose and direction.
  4. Personal competence and pride: Children should feel confident in their ability to meet the challenges in their lives. This comes from having success in solving problems, being creative and seeing results from their efforts.
  5. Trust: Children need to feel like they are trusted by their parents, caregivers and other children. To help children feel trusted, you need to be sure to keep promises you make to them and give them chances to be trustworthy.
  6. Self-discipline and control: As children are gaining independence, they need to sense that they can make it on their own. Give them opportunities and guidelines for them to test themselves.
  7. Accepting mistakes and failure: Children need to know that when they make a mistake they are not defeated. When a child makes a mistakes or fails, explain that hurdles and setbacks are a normal part of life and the important thing is to always try their hardest and to ask for help when they need it. Support them with constructive criticism that is designed to help them improve, not to make them feel discouraged or humiliated.

Words by Marichen Klaver, she is a registered Counsellor/student Educational Psychologist at Sparrow Schools. She holds a B.Ed Senior & Fet phase in Mathematics and English. B.Ed honours in Educational Psychology. She is also currently completing her M.Ed in Educational Psychology.

Klaver forms part of the organisation’s Learner Support Unit. This is a multidisciplinary team of therapists who provide additional academic and emotional support across the organisation.

Occupational Therapy, Speech Therapy, Remedial Therapy and Counselling is provided individually or in small groups. Standardised and screening assessment is conducted to track the progress and development of learners.

To book an assessment for your child for 2017, contact 011 482 1015.

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